The global issues depicted in home a documentary by yann arthus bertrand

It took days of shooting in 54 countries, which added up to hours of footage. It will take anything the Earth does to it. It includes a moving narration about the evolution of the Earth, nature, agriculture, humans, and the crises of habitat destruction, energy depletion, climate disruption, degradation…of the environment, health, economic disparity, and more.

Review of Home by Yann-Arthus Bertrand

Although there is a general trend in our societies towards an awareness of ecological issues, concrete action is still too little, too slow—which constitutes in some ways the creed of the movie: I saw how moved the audience was—to tears in some cases—and I said to myself that a feature film was an excellent way of reaching people," he said in an interview at the press release brochure.

So a forest is turned into meat. The polar ice caps are melting fast due to global warming and the ecological balance is being threatened. The real threat to the island is not ecological disequilibrium, but the inevitable erosion back into the ocean. The most striking images are those of natural cities, particularly one which seems to grow out of the rock as if it were only a feature of it.

But no matter how useful satellite photography is, you cannot truly see depth without aerial photography, and the master of aerial photography is without a doubt French photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrandfamous for enormous coffee-table books filled with photography so rich as to be overwhelming.

Bertrand is doing his part in that revolution by showing the film around the world -- for free. You can watch it on YouTube or download it from your favorite BitTorrent source.

Sometimes it is presented in HOME, but subtly, between the lines as implications or evocations. At best, good intentions can save some forests, cut back some on greenhouse gas emissions, but trends will not turn around until the capitalist model of growth is terminated for lack of energy and materials.

Stunning, incredible, breathtaking, horrific, disturbing, depressing - these are all words I would use to describe HOMEa new documentary from French filmmaker Yann Arthus-Bertrand, narrated by Glenn Close. They produce enough grain to fee two billion people.

Never is a serious look taken at the process of the natural cities, which to someone trapped in the paradigm of control and prediction would make absolutely no sense, but which Christopher Alexander masterfully demystifies in The Nature of Order.

The Earth From On High: A Review of HOME

And not to forget, the background music was good. Bertrand has made a huge contribution to the discussion about what is happening to our home, the planet Earth, by making this film. Clearly explained is the urgent situation that we must resolve or our planet will suffer more deep catastrophic damages from climate and environmental disruption.

Bertrand started his career as a photographer and knows how to elicit a strong emotional response with his imagery. But life is not a simple process. So I, like an idiot, sat in front of my laptop and watched the documentary attentively on YouTube and kept stopping in between to make notes.

Petrocollapse will take care of this. We can sound the alarm about the total global population, the fact is we have absolutely no idea what the total global population is. The filming was done using high-definition " Cineflex " cameras which were suspended from a gyro-stabilized sphere from rails on the base of the helicopter.

Keep a water bottle with you. In fact, the film was released in and he has shown it in many countries, but it took him two years to bring it to America, where we have problems marrying the concepts of "free" and "copyrighted.

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Bertrand saw an opportunity to use his exceptional photography skills as a means to influence a large audience through film and, as Bertrand puts it, "tell the fantastic story of life on Earth - our story. It is not so much climate change that is feared, but the unknown, any change at all.

But the narration reveals a lack of understanding of the implications of peak oil. We have no time to be pessimistic. Arthus-Bertrand has made the jump to high-definition cinematography and directed a "documentary" there is really no accurate way to describe this film called Home, which was released free of charge on the Internet a few weeks ago.

Why is a movie from above necessary? Near Khudiala, Rajasthan, India.HOME, a new documentary from French filmmaker Yann Arthus-Bertrand, narrated by Glenn Close, is a tremendous illustration of nature at its finest and humanity's impact on it at its most destructive.

The film is showing for free at the East Village Cinema starting tomorrow. Arthus-Bertrand has made the jump to high-definition cinematography and directed a "documentary" (there is really no accurate way to describe this film) called Home, which was released free of charge on the Internet a few weeks ago.

Next World Environment Day, this Friday, is also the date set for the world premiere of Yann Arthus Bertrand's Home Documentary.

The movie is a collection of unique aerial footage from over 50 countries, which will try to show the state of the planet in natural and urban areas with. May 12,  · We are living in exceptional times. Scientists tell us that we have 10 years to change the way we live, avert the depletion of natural resources and the catastrophic evolution of the Earth's climate.

H O M E WORKSHEET (An English language learning exercise based on the Earth from Above by Yann Arthus-Bertrand) Source: HOME (93 minutes in English with subtitles. With this film, Arthus-Bertrand hopes to provide a stepping-stone to further the call to action to take care of our HOME.

HOME is the first film that has been made using aerial-only footage. The film marks artist-activist Yann Arthus-Bertrand’s feature film directorial debut.

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The global issues depicted in home a documentary by yann arthus bertrand
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